How to plan a wedding six months out

How to plan a wedding six months out

May 01, 2019

Transitioning Seasons

As a wedding planner, I'm constantly taking into consideration our transitioning seasons. Most of my brides and grooms are planning at least 6-9 months in advance. This means we're planning in May what we'll see in fall or winter. As a result, it keeps me contemplating the need to make the appropriate choices for my clients and lead them down the right path.

Flowers

For instance, flowers: what we're looking at in May is nowhere close to the arrangement of flowers that we can conceive in November. We could probably acquire a room full of beautiful, fluffy peonies in May or June and not one in October or November. If this is the case, and my bride is in love with the romance of the peony, then I need to help her come up with an equally romantic and billowy substitute. There's always a small chance we can acquire one or two peonies or one or two ranunculus or one or two tulips for her bouquet, but they cannot be the subject of the table arrangements. It becomes very important for me (and, of course, our florist) to understand which floral substitutes we can provide to get the same effect-beauty, romance, and femininity.

Same Goes For Weather

Our weather in November, although it's sunny almost every day of the year in San Diego, requires us to have a formidable backup plan should we be faced with inclement conditions. Whether we anticipate the expected chilly evening weather in November or a rainstorm, we have to keep the budget and design in check. I usually offer a low, medium, and high plan of action. Should we provide each guest with an umbrella or should we erect a full tent to cover the entire ceremony area? There is a vast difference in price and over-all look.

My last example of seasonal choices is attire: will the groomsmen wear a tan suit or a black tux? Especially here in San Diego and other beach wedding destinations, the wedding party attire accounts for much of the seasonal look. Wearing a short dress in the summer makes a lot of sense. Wearing a tan colored suit or Seasucker fabric is simply inappropriate for winter. I help explain these differences so that we are not caught off guard.

It's now spring and I'm knee deep in planning for my fall and winter weddings. All these transitional examples have already been taken into consideration and we're set to go. I'm looking forward to our next seasons and the beautiful nuptials they bring!




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